Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Can we save earth for humanity? Yes, we can

The understanding of what carbon emissions can do to change the climate, what global warming and greenhouse gases are all about, and what can be done to save the earth are all intricate issues. It's all very easy to talk about these things and walk away, doing as we do very little on the ground.

What is the ideal level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, in terms of parts per million? Is it too much already, and is it likely to go up further? What can be done to stabilise the level at some point? Since plants consume carbon dioxide, would growing more plants, for instance, be part of the solution? What does CO2 do to climate really? Will rise in temperature by a degree or two affect the life cycle? Are the tropics doomed? Will glaciers melt? Will there be flooding even as there is likelihood of drought in many places? How does the link between CO2, microbes and carbon emissions really work? Are there ways in which carbon can be stored without microbes gnawing at it and putting it back into the atmosphere?

Well, Oliver Morton has written a wonderful article (Building a Better Biosphere) in The New York Times. A must read for all those who are keen to know what global warming and climate change are all about.

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